Respiratory muscles and their neuromotor control proceedings of an IUPS satellite symposium held in Los Angeles, California, July 22-24, 1986

Cover of: Respiratory muscles and their neuromotor control |

Published by Liss in New York .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Respiratory muscles -- Congresses.,
  • Respiration -- Regulation -- Congresses.,
  • Lungs -- Innervation -- Congresses.,
  • Lung -- innervation -- congresses.,
  • Muscles -- congresses.,
  • Respiration -- congresses.

About the Edition

A satellite symposium of the 30th triennial congress of the International Union of Physiological Sciences held in July 1986 at Vancouver, British Columbia.

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographies and index.

Book details

Statementeditors, Gary C. Sieck, Simon C. Gandevia, William E. Cameron.
SeriesNeurology and neurobiology ;, v. 26
ContributionsSieck, Gary C., Gandevia, Simon C., Cameron, William E., International Union of Physiological Sciences., International Congress of Physiological Sciences (30th : 1986 : Vancouver, B.C.)
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQP123 .R47 1987
The Physical Object
Paginationxix, 477 p. :
Number of Pages477
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2733502M
ISBN 100845127284
LC Control Number86027742

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Respiratory Muscles and their Neuromotor Control: Proceedings of an IUPS Satellite Symposium Held in Los Angeles, California July(Neurology and Neurobiology Vol.

26) [Simon C. Gandevia, and William E. Cameron Edited by Gary C. Sieck] on Author: Edited by Gary C. Sieck, Simon C.

Gandevia, and William E. Cameron. Although other texts exist that examine the control of breathing and other specialized topics considered in this volume, Neural Control of the Respiratory Muscles is the first major single-volume publication that takes a broad view of muscle control during non-respiratory behaviors and the coordination of respiration with non-respiratory by: Respiratory muscles and their neuromotor control: proceedings of an IUPS satellite symposium held in Los Angeles, California, JulyAuthor: Gary C Sieck ; Simon C Gandevia ; William E Cameron ; International Union of Physiological Sciences.

"Respiratory Muscle Strength Training Theory and Practice is an excellent resource for clinicians who are beginning to use RMST.

This book provides a solid foundation in respiratory anatomy and physiology which explains the why and how of by: 3. Respiratory Muscle Training: theory and practice is the world’s first book which provides an "everything-you-need-to-know" guide to respiratory muscle training (RMT).

Authored by an internationally-acclaimed leading expert, it is an evidence-based resource, built upon current scientific knowledge, as well as clinical experience at the cutting Cited by: This book provides an overview of the anatomy and physiology of our respiratory muscles, including their neural control.

This book also includes an overview of the basic structure and function of. Neuromotor control of skeletal muscles, including respiratory muscles, is ultimately dependent on the structure and function of the motor units (motoneurons and the muscle fibers they innervate) co.

Neuromotor control of skeletal muscles, including respiratory muscles, is ultimately dependent on the structure and function of the motor units (motoneurons and the muscle.

Respiratory Muscle Training: theory and practice is the world’s first book which provides an "everything-you-need-to-know" guide to respiratory muscle training (RMT). Authored by an internationally-acclaimed leading expert, it is an evidence-based resource, built upon current scientific knowledge, as well as clinical experience at the cutting.

in skeletal muscles, the final common pathway for neuromotor control is the motor unit, comprising a motoneuron and the group of muscle fibers it force is increased by the recruitment of additional motor units (15, 53) or by increasing the discharge frequency of those units recruited (frequency coding) ().The contractile and fatigue properties of motor units can vary widely Cited by: Control of Respiration Respiration is controlled by these areas of the brain that stimulate the contraction of the diaphragm and the intercostal muscles.

These areas, collectively called respiratory centers, are summarized here. Neuromotor control of skeletal muscles, including respiratory muscles, is ultimately dependent on the structure and function of the motor units (motoneurons and the muscle fibers they innervate) comprising the by: Accordingly, abdominal muscles are classified as accessory respiratory muscles, and their recruitment is also used in the clinical setting as an indicator of respiratory loading.

Upper airway muscles Dilator muscles of the pharynx and larynx minimize upper airway resistance during inspiration, thus facilitating airflow into and out of the lungs (87,).Cited by:   McCully, K.

& Chance B., in Respiratory Muscles and Their Neuromotor Control – (Liss; New York, ). Google ScholarCited by: Respiratory Muscle Training: theory and practice is the world’s first book to provide an "everything-you-need-to-know" guide to respiratory muscle training (RMT).

Authored by an internationally-acclaimed expert, it is an evidence-based resource, built upon current scientific knowledge, as well as experience at the cutting-edge of respiratory training in a wide range of settings.

Respiratory Physiotherapy for Cerebral Palsy. I highly recommend your book to anyone who is perceptive about their health, and for those who are tired of being told that it's all in their heads. Reduced physical activity is a risk factor for pulmonary complications, and theimpaired neuromotor control in these patients can inhibit the.

Although other texts exist that examine the control of breathing and other specialized topics considered in this volume, Neural Control of the Respiratory Muscles is the first major single-volume publication that takes a broad view of muscle control during non-respiratory behaviors and the coordination of respiration with non-respiratory behaviors.

The final common effector of skeletal muscle neuromotor control is the motor unit consisting of a motoneuron and the group of muscle fibers it innervates (Liddell and Sherrington, ).With recruitment of additional motor units force increases (Fournier and Sieck,Sieck, ).In addition, for those units recruited, force increases with increasing discharge frequency (Iscoe et al., ).Cited by: The respiratory muscles and the mechanics of breathing Hardcover – January 1, by E.

Moran. Campbell (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Hardcover, Import, January 1, Author: E. Moran.

Campbell. The risk for respiratory complications and infections is substantially increased in old age, which may be due, in part, to sarcopenia (aging-related weakness and atrophy) of the diaphragm muscle (DIAm), reducing its force generating capacity and impairing the ability to perform expulsive non-ventilatory motor behaviors critical for airway by: The muscles involved in ventilation, the actual movement of air into the lungs, are called pump muscles.

On the other hand, airway muscles are another group of respiratory muscles that control the caliber of upper and lower airways and are comprised of both skeletal (upper airways) and smooth (trachea and bronchi) by: Human respiratory muscles: Three levels of control Article Literature Review (PDF Available) in Human Physiology 35(2) March with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Ampakines stimulate respiratory neuromotor output and ventilation in Pompe mice, and therefore they have potential as an adjunctive therapy in Pompe disease. Keywords: ampakines, Pompe disease, respiratory insufficiency, neuropathology, medullaCited by: respiratory control centers: The medulla which sends signals to the muscles involved in breathing, and the pons which controls the rate of breathing.

chemorecepters: These are receptors in the medulla and in the aortic and carotid bodies of the blood vessels that detect changes in blood pH and signal the medulla to correct those changes.

In: Respiratory Muscles and Their Neuromotor Control, edited by Sieck GC, Gandevia SC, Cameron WE. New York: Alan R. Liss, Inc,p. – Google Scholar; Frey D, Schneider C, Xu L, Borg J, Spooren W, Caroni P. Early and selective loss of neuromuscular synapse subtypes with low sprouting competence in motoneuron by: Fibre composition of respiratory muscles is an important factor for their endurance and contractile properties.

There are two fibre types, the fast (FT) and slow (ST) twitch fibres. Respiratory Muscle Training: theory and practice is the world's first book which provides an "everything-you-need-to-know" guide to respiratory muscle training (RMT). Authored by an internationally-acclaimed leading expert, it is an evidence-based resource, built upon current scientific knowledge, as well as clinical experience at the cutting Pages: 3.

Muscle fiber type and motor unit classification. The concept of the motor unit as the basic functional element of neuromotor control was first proposed by Sherrington in (Liddell and Sherrington,Sherrington, ).Motor units are classified into specific types based on the mechanical and fatigue properties of the muscle fibers comprising each unit (Burke,Burke et al Cited by: Brain Research, () Elsevier BRE Gravitational representation of simultaneously recorded brainstem respiratory neuron spike trains Bruce G.

Lindsey~, Roger Shannon1 and George L. Gerstein2 1Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of South Florida Health Sciences Center, Tampa, FL (U.S.A.) and -'Department of Physiology, University of Cited by: Respiratory Action of the Intercostal Muscles. André De Troyer, Peter A. Kirkwood, and Respiratory Muscles and their Neuromotor Control, edited by G.

Sieck, S. Gandevia, and W. Cameron. New York: Liss,p. Interaction between postural and respiratory control of human intercostal muscles. J Appl Physiol Cited by:   Respiratory muscles are essential to alveolar ventilation. These muscles work against increased mechanical loads due to airflow limitation and geometrical changes of the thorax derived from pulmonary hyperinflation.

Respiratory muscle fibres show several degrees of impairment in cellular and subcellular structures which, in many cases, are proportional to the severity of the disease and Cited by: Abstract.

Other investigators (14, 15) and ourselves (1, 2, 4) have previously demonstrated that electrical as well as chemical stimulation of the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) in the medulla induces marked depressant effects on respiratory activities in cats and other by: 5.

Neuromotor control of skeletal muscles, including respiratory muscles, is ultimately dependent on the function of the motor unit (comprising an individual motoneuron and the muscle fibers it innerv Cited by: neuromotor control of the diaphragm muscle is organized similarly to other skeletal muscles, with the final common output being the motor unit, comprising a phrenic motoneuron and the diaphragm muscle fibers it innervates (28,).Properties of the motor unit population are critically important in determining the functional characteristics of the diaphragm during a variety of motor by: respiratory time (TTOT) SHS Control Mechanisms Physiology-­‐ Central Control of Breathing.

Normal inspiration: external intercostals and diaphragm Normal expiration: passive. Forced inspiration: scalene, sternocleidomastoid, neck and back muscles, upper respiratory tract muscles Forced expiration: abdominals, intercostals, back and. The Rhythm of Breathing Animates mammalian life, and the source of this rhythm, the noeud vital (), is basic oscillator lies within the brainstem, but technical limitations of experiments in the mammalian nervous system in vivo have hindered localization of the neurons generating the rhythm ().An in vitro preparation of neonatal mammalian brainstem and spinal cord that.

Respiratory groups. The respiratory centre is divided into three major groups, two in the medulla and one in the pons. The two groups in the medulla are the dorsal respiratory group and the ventral respiratory the pons, the pontine respiratory group is made up of two areas – the pneumotaxic centre and the apneustic centre.

The dorsal and ventral medullary groups control the basic MeSH: D Abstract. Previous studies by us 2–5,7,8 and others 9,15 demonstrated that the cervical respiratory neurons are localized in upper cervical segments C 1 to C 3, near the border of the intermediate gray matter in cats, rats and neurons, which are mostly inspiratory in cats, receive descending inputs from the brainstem, have axons which descend in the cord ipsilaterally and Cited by: 8.

The muscles of respiration are those muscles that contribute to inhalation and exhalation, by aiding in the expansion and contraction of the thoracic diaphragm and, to a lesser extent, the intercostal muscles drive respiration during quiet onal 'accessory muscles of respiration' are typically only used under conditions of high metabolic demand (e.g.

exercise) or MeSH: D   For gas exchange, the air of the environment has to be exchanged in the alveoli, which corresponds to their ventilation. This is realized by the alternating build-up of pressure differences between the surrounding air and the lungs so that respiratory air can flow in (inspiration) and out (expiration).The lung follows the movements of the thoracic wall due to the negative pressure in the.

Abstract. The generation and maintenance of respiratory rhythm is currently the subject of some controversy, with several theories available for its’ origin, based on experimental results from in vivo 1 and in vitro preparations.

While there appear to be some age-dependent differences in rhythm generation mechanisms, there is little question that synaptic interconnection between Cited by: 3.David Lacomis, in Office Practice of Neurology (Second Edition), Lower Motor Neuron Disorders.

Lower motor neuron disorders (Table ) account for the majority of neurologic diseases that affect respiration and ultimately result in alveolar disorders may cause diaphragmatic dysfunction and present with dyspnea, especially on exertion and when supine.Respiratory Muscles and Their Neuromotor Control, Sieck GC, Gandevia SC, Cameron WE.

LissNew York Google Scholar; 55 Hilfiker S, Pieribone VA, Czernik AJ, Kao HT, Augustine GJ, Greengard P.

Synapsins as regulators of neurotransmitter release. Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci Crossref PubMed ISI Google Scholar; 56 Cited by:

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